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CSPAN
Nov 30, 2009 1:00am EST
compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that if we did not deal with the financial crisis in these unfunded liabilit
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 11:00pm EST
united states army, and that was how congress does it made him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nations forces, he dowson its forces, patrolled its frontiers and for most of that time, he also said america's military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere. and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings of agent passed on they would have carried the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to the expedition. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation things to his warnings he was a pretty effective agent it has to be said. and then there is also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy, and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he makes snakes seem like a model of rectitude and chameleons, chameleons look good, ideals of consistency compared with wilkinson. and i simply
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 6:00am EST
enemies of the united states? i find that shameful, sir. >> my title is general after 32 years of military service. >> i apologize. >> -- wounded in action i'm offended by your deliberate marginalization of my viewpoint and let me know what to say -- >> i was quoting you, sir, are those not quotes? are the quotes, yes or no? >> i'm offended by your language. >> you are offended by your quotes? >> let me go on to respond -- >> what part of your quotes of and you? >> are you going to let me answer? >> i have five minutes i can do whatever i wish. so, go ahead. i want to know are you offended by your quotes? i was quoting you. >> if you're asking me if i think the cubans are a national security threat to the united states my answer is if you ask for the top 20 national security threats they wouldn't be among them. now, my actual viewpoint, however, is that u.s. national interest will be better served by lifting the travel ban, by engaging in diplomatic contact with them and indeed -- >> my specific questions were asking you whether you do not feel that our security would be at any ri
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2009 11:00pm EST
very difficult to understand during the last eight years united states has become cuba's principal food supply year and fifth largest trading partner, but americans cannot walk our streets or shop with our people. only recently we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. it should be recalled that the iron curtain started to open up by millions of westerners visiting the country's. we are grateful to the politicians who carried out the policy that helped create the conditions for this peaceful outcome. americans played a significant role. today you have a similar opportunity regarding cuba. we are aware of the concern of many distinguished congress women and men of the financial the impact of american tourism on the cuban economy, fearing that the civility of giving birth to the totalitarian regime we believe that many thousands of americans visiting cuba would benefit our society and enhance our people. firstly through the free flow of ideas and further asking the government to open up and provide goods and services such as renting rooms because the capacities in
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 8:00pm EST
president of the united states. my secret service manual tells me to protect the president of the united states and that was lyndon johnson. you stay with kennedy and i'm going to johnson. so he goes and -- his the first person to give a report to lyndon johnson. robert made up his mind that kennedy is dead but when he sees johnson that isn't what he says. what he says to johnson he says i have seen the president's wounds and i don't think he can survive. and johnson says i need more information. i want to hear from kennedy o'donnell who was appointed secretary in fact the sort of chief of staff for the kennedy white house. and he wants to hear from president kennedy's secret service agent. so emory roberts leaves the room and as he leaves the room he runs into who had arrived at hospital late and didn't see anything that happened and he says to roberts have you seen what is the president's condition and he says very matter-of-factly the president is dead and leader roberts told him johnson didn't know what i knew just kennedy was dead. the next person that comes in is roy kellerm
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 9:00pm EST
trial" was the most important trial in the history of the united states. that's my conclusion after studying dates as closely as i could. and that is the purport of my book. i tried to explain in my book why i believe that to be true and i'll try to give you a suggestion of why you believe that to be true in my remarks here tonight. john brown's trial was the first trial in the history of the united states to receive massive attention from national media. it was the first trial in which the defendant was executed for treason against a state as opposed to treason against the united states. it was the first trial in which an accused defendant appealed to a higher law, to justify violent crimes. it was a trial that involved more than just a determination of an individual's guilt or innocence according to laws laid down in statute books and in case reports. it was a trial that pitted two starkly different moral visions against each other. one of these divisions descended the institution of slavery as traditional, necessary, just, and worthy of protection from outside interference. parti
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 11:00am EST
of the united states from 1789 to the end of the war of 1812. he writes that founders of the national government disliked the idea political parties and wish to see the demise of slavery in the north. at the redwood library in newport rhode island, is an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] thank you very much. it is a pleasure to be back here in this magnificent building. 18th century library, which i think is one of the architectural marvels of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. i am delighted to be back here again. this book which is a big fat book, can be used as a doorstop if you decide not to read it. it will work that way. the title of the book comes from a statement of jefferson turkey referred to united states, jefferson being the most expansive mind of president in history. he referred to united states that he was present up as an empire of liberty. different kind of empire is what he saw. and he as i said had great visions for the growth of this united states. i have introduced this book with a little brief description of rip van winkle's -- washington i
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 7:00am EST
of african-americans who served in the congress of these united states, served in the united states senate. served in executive offices. do you even recall that in 1852:frederick douglass was actually nominated on a ticket to be vice president of the united states? and then, in 1901 there was this speech, i can't remember the member's name, who was the last african-american to serve and then there was a gulf of some 30 long years without vigilance. without a commitment, great progress that has been worked for can be eroded and erased. and we have to keep in mind as we think about tomorrow, the powerful lessons of history. the powerful lessons of history. i want to say this about public policy. the purpose in getting people elected to office is so they can make a difference. not so that they can have m. c. behind their name. not because they can do an occasional television interview. the purpose for getting elected to public office is not to just be there. the purpose is to work to make a difference. and that difference manifests itself in the design and implementation of public policy chan
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 7:00pm EST
the reduces and consumers. america, the united states is one of our major trading partners. we supply an essential part of the oil in the united states. of course, a little oil also goes to europe, so half and half, europe and north america. and finally to other various trading arrangements. we believe that the current market situation is one that has to be handled with such a mind of delicacy because in the process of recovery and intel it's fully recovered, we will have to be careful how much oil we put in the market retries if we're not careful then it could try the prices very low, like they went as low as $30 a barrel at the height of the economic problems the world experienced over the past year or so. we are hopeful that the recovery of the national oil will continue. in which case, we will be able to reduce an export more. we have, i'm sure you have heard about the recent problems in nigeria, which resulted in serious demolition of our capacity to produce and damage to our oil infrastructure. but with the recent fortune and occurrence of the amnesty we are hoping that we will
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 7:30am EST
words, what is the role of the united states as a very significant shareholder in general motors. we're not looking at it from the auto industry but across the institution where we have a significant interest and what role the united states is playing in the management of those companies. the united states is the government the obama administration stated repeatedly that it wants to have the board run the company the way they deem appropriate and that's obviously a policy balance against the concerns raised by you which is taxpayer money being used to fund opal and make sure europeans maintain their jobs. we're going to do an audit product that really takes a look at what the obama administration has said its role is going to be and compare to what's actually happened and see how those match up and come up with some ideas and recommendations going forward. so we're going to take a look from an audit perspective but it's important to remember that when this money was invested, whether it was with general motors or citi or in the capital purchase program, different level of conditi
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 2:00pm EST
bachmann. i hail from the great state of minnesota. i am and my third year in the united states congress and i am privileged to be able to sit on the financial services committee. and who would've known that for the last two, three years that financial services committee would be the center of the universe when it comes to taking a look at what's happening with the economic meltdown that so many americans have had to deal with and look at. joining me today is an author of a great new book that i know everyone will be interested in, it's called "architects of ruin." and the author is mr. peter schweizer. he will join us today to talk a little bit about what happened with the economic meltdown, how did we get here, who are the key players, what are we going to do and how do we get out so we can get back into prosperity. peter, i want to thank you for joining me today. and for booktv. so let's talk a bit about your book, "architects of ruin." how long has been a? >> just a couple of weeks. >> what have you been hearing from people so far? >> it's interesting to a lot of people reaction, a l
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2009 9:00am EST
is very creative. i think -- i believe in congress. i believe in the united states. don't get me started on that. but i believe you have power that others of us don't and that's why we elect you to this office. as a constituent with six grandchildren, i'm asking you to please help the youth of our day now and the future football players of tomorrow to stay safe. call it an osha deal, call it anything you want. but they go from being our youth in america to our employees. and we have, i believe, as americans, an obligation to make this a safer sport. >> i appreciate that. the last comment, mr. chairman, as i mentioned, you're not the only person, grant you, i have 7.5 and four kids and i think it's the parents role at the very early age to take care of the safety of their children. i certainly don't think the federal government has a role in intervene in that. but congress may have a role in making sure that there may be some funds for research and development. but getting involved in the every day operation of an nfl football team, congress is not qualified to do that. maybe we s
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 11:00pm EST
husidics had a choice, go back to boss the kneia, or end up in the united states. they went to chicago. >> that's when i finally felt like you can enjoy life now, we've made it. you can relax now. you know, it's yours, so, you know, i always, like, wanted to have a house i could have friends over and stuff, and every day, like, since we had the house, i always have people over, there's not like one day where my mom is not cooking for everyone. but in bosnia, it's just like that. you always have family over, friends over, you're grilling. >> reporter: and from there, life was good. boggio starred in soccer, and now he's getting plenty of playing time for the fire. >> i can't really describe like how you feel, like -- because you, like, you remember, when you go back, it all comes back to you like everything happened yesterday, and its just like, you know, it's -- you try to make it happy where you get to see your family again, but as soon as like that goes away, like, wow, like i left all of this behind. what if i didn't have this sort of future? >> reporter: and so you can understand w
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 8:00am EST
competitiveness of the united states. three, to promote competition because that's how we'll get the most innovation and investment. and fourth, to protect and empower consumers. >> host: well, before we get into some specific issues, there are two things that i've noticed from reading your speeches. number one, the use of the word ecosystem. [laughter] and the use of the word robust. could you talk about those a little bit? >> guest: it's interesting that you've noticed those because i don't think i did that deliberately, but on ecosystem, it's an important concept because there are so many different pieces of this communication landscape, our communications infrastructure. take our networks, our kind of wired networks over which communications travel or our wireless networks too. we need ongoing investment in those networks, we need those networks to get more robust, we need them to get smarter. there's been literally billions of dollars of private investment in those networks over the last number of years. that is essential, and it's essential that it continue. that's part of the ecosy
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 10:00pm EST
generation. rosemary mariner is retired captain in the united states navy and actually a neighbor of mine in tennessee. and her and her husband, chuck, she has been on the faculty of the national war college, and in fact just a little while ago i was reading thomas's latest book about the battle, the war in iraq, and she was quoted, i thought that was pretty cool. i knew someone who was quoted in a book. .. i am grateful for their presence, but all the more i thank you for being here because of the major competition that we had at this hour. as the airlines say, we know you had a choice, and we thank you for choosing to fly with us, and lying is a very appropriate term both for this session and for our major competition. it is also appropriate that we are doing this at this particular time because this is a national eight the air force week. we are right in the midst of that week, and of course with my ranking, we have a pilot and crew who flew with the eighth air force. as tom posed mentioned, of course i have written articles and books that have dealt with the american civil war in one
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 2:00pm EST
at the united states military academy. and raised a in that amount, five years of young leaders who served in iraq, who have also served in afghanistan, and who have made an important contribution to the military of the nation. >> host: absolutely. i'm sure you've seen many of them. >> i have to say it's the most humbling and exciting experience to go into a theater of war and to see someone who you last saw as young cadet in command of soldiers. in fact, i had quite an experience going to visit a very good student, someone whom i had mentored very closely in may 2007 when he was commanding a company in southern baghdad. and i have to say, to see him in command, was as i said, one of the most humbling experiences. it really is unusual for a civilian to be able to see the fruits of teaching officership. >> host: right in the heart of it, southern baghdad. we will get to that. i think in reading this book, if i was a casual observer, i would still have no idea the extent to which you yourself were involved in the surge. you detach yourself well within the book. probably because you're
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 8:30am EST
-changing ideas that will become the policies of the united states tomorrow. with that, thank you for being here. welcome to today. i hope you get a lot out of today. it's my pleasure, now, to introduce the first of two co-chairmen of the american council on renewable energy. john geeseman was the executive directer the beginning of his career, spence 19 years then in finance, came back as the commissioner of the california energy commission and is given credit for much of the policies of the state of california that's the lead of our country. please welcome, john geesman. [applause] >> i bring you greetings from the west coast. as historians look across the last several decades, our national energy policy they're likely to find common patterns no matter which party is in power. abdicated responsibilities, squandered opportunities, willful avoidance of unpleasant realities. recently, that's started to change. whether we recognize it or not, there is a race underway. most of the major economies of the world are striving to radically expand the size of their domestic renewable energy ma
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 8:00am EST
official betting parlor for the obermeyer and the rehnquist was the chief justice of the united states. and it was -- that was it. on the afternoon before the election, he predicted and changed his long hand bet that george w. bush would both out gore by an elect form margin of 320-218. he earlier in the day picked 305-320, much closer. his long hand betting card, then 10 days after the bet, he sent me a letter on supreme court stationery, one of the few formal letters i ever received, asking to be excused from a $1 bet, because, and i'm going to quote, it is remotely possible that the florida election case might come to our court. i will point out to you that the long hand betting card with the corrections and the letter are reproduced in my book. i think one of the more interesting parts of it. i also explained why he believed that he and his colleagues acted couragely and patriotically when they decided twice to get involved in the bush-gore disputed elections. he knew that taking on the case would be a thankless assignment, regardless of which candidate won, the justices would be vilifi
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2009 8:30am EST
recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to investing in
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 12:00am EST
people feel that he could have become the president of the united states if he had lived. he was, as jefferson so aptly wrote, of courage undaunted possessing a firmness and perseverance of purpose, which nothing but impossibilities could do for from its direction. we owe it to his memory to try and establish the cause of his death. i'd like to invite you to visit our books website and sign-up for my e-mail newsletter, which i put out about once a month if you want to stay current with the developments. thank you. now we can have fun and just talk about what is on your mind. >> i have a question. [inaudible] why do you think, i mean clark had a lot of power later on. why do you think if you believe the lewis had been murdered that he didn't conduct an investigation? >> that's a good question. and it's a natural one. i think the answer is that general wilkinson was commanding general of the united states army and that would've opened an investigation that nobody wanted to have. it did happen not a month after lewis' death, general wilkinson was recalled to washington to be investigate
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2009 8:00pm EST
his dreams out on the soccer field right here in the united states. >>> and the husband saving his wife's life, but they say the philadelphia phillies played a major role in her recovery. we'll tell you how that happened, and you'll hear her amazing story. you're watching net impact on >>> here is another tidbit for you. former president dwight eisenhower, gerald ford, and ron at reagan all reached the highest office in our land, but before they were president, they were each standout athletes in college. wow. now this. what a year it's been for this next athlete. his name is bofgio. the chicago fire welcomed the rookie mid-fielder to her roster, and being all to play in front of his own hometown has been. a a dream come true, especially when you consider that his journey began in another country where his memories of death and destruction still remain a big part of him. josh mora has gee or geo's story. >> i spent a lot of time playing with my family, so that's really basically it, that i remember, is just playing around with my cousins, running in the wood, and that sort of thing
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 12:00pm EST
spent over 2.2 trillion every year on health care in the united states. surely we can cover 23 million women. it's a tiny fraction of $2.2 trillion. i'd also like to say that any insurance company that is thinking right now that this report should be used as a way to reduce coverage will be watching very carefully. we'll be watching. so access, clarity, and public trust are critical. but so to is perhaps the center piece of what it is we are having the most trouble with. that's technology. in a strange way, all of the dust up from the past week actually may do some good. maybe it's a call. finally. we know mammography works. but we also know it's imperfect. we do need better screening technology. this technology that we're using today, though it's been improved and regenerated is still almost 50 years ago. what other business or field that we know in the united states around the world would use 50-year-old technology. this is a huge technology gap. in breast cancer and cancer screening. susan g. komen for the cure funding cutting-edge research. but we can't do it alone. we need
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 1:00pm EST
, to the united states in 1926, he committed an act of violence, attempted murder, in los angeles. and was incarcerated in san quentin prison. this becomes a very crucial question as to the veracity of his famous book, "out of the night" when it eventually appears, but immediately have the following effects on him. kreps became one of the editors, the contributors to the san quentin prisoners magazine. he took lots of extension courses in writing from the university of california again he at that point determined to become a writer. however, he got out of san quentin in 1929. was deported. went back to europe. got cut up again in communistic activities. according to him, he was thrown into jail by the nazis, from which he escaped by the following rules. he pretended to have converted to not use them. the nazis allowed him to go out so he would go back and be a double agent working with his former communist allies. day, however, didn't think there was anything phony about his conversion. and under these circumstances he said, chased by the secret police both of russia and germany. he to
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2009 7:00am EST
man who combined a career as commander in chief of the united states army and that's how congress designated him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nation's forces. he garrisoned its forts and patrolled the forests. and at the same time he fed the military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings that agent 13 passed on they would have captured the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to their westward exploration. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation thanks to his warning. so he was a pretty effective agent. it has to be said. and then there's also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he really makes sort of snakes seem like a model of good and chameleons look good compa
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 7:00am EST
in the united states. if you look at who the players were among conservative protestants in 1960, you see some of the leading lights of what we now call the religious right first becoming active in that election. people like billy graham, the national association of evangelicals, and a host of smaller conservative protestant players really broke in their sweatshirt and sneakers in that election as they discovered they had political power. and that politicians cared about their opinions. the trajectory takes off that by now certainly the religious right is a very powerful force. 1960s where they really began to get thirst and taste for playing a very large and high political level. so those are all good reasons i think were thinking about this election in 1960s because those themes reverberate down to this day. what did i learn in the process of writing this book? sort of two major lessons. first of all, kennedy had a very sophisticated approach to his catholicism because all of his holdings told him that this would be the major problem in the american electorate, whether or not t
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 10:15pm EST
help that we have supporters on a list from every single post office in the united states. we are getting other religious groups to do the same the as many millions will be personally circulated. it is felt the majority of these lists are democratic or independent voters and it is felt this would bring about a favorable slang among these voters to you. graham concluded his epistle by announcing that peale was planning to endorse nixon in a sermon. he also extended an invitation for nixon to visit the homan north carolina which is now become a regular requirements of most presidential nominees the my tip north carolina and nixon with high and light the issue without any overt mention of the topic. the next day grant sent a shorter letter with to urgent matters emitted from the first letter. in rio de janeiro at the baptist world alliance meeting shortly after king and kennedy met for three hours at kennedy's home. according to graham king was impressed and just about sold. graham fully realized what was at stake with king's blessing. i think at least neutralize him and if you could
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 9:00am EST
the security of the united states, it is essential that our government agencies are sharing information about such individuals. what happens been in the media these last days about major hasan and his behavior, if determined to be true, is very disturbing. such allegations as justifying suicide bombing on the internet, lecturing fellow soldiers using jihadist rhetoric, warning about adverse events if muslims were not allowed to leave military service, repeatedly seeking counsel from a radical islamic imam with well-known ties to al-qaeda. attempting to convert some of his patients who were suffering from stress disorders to his distorted view of islam and finally, was the fbi sharing with the army what it knew about hasan and aulaqi and was the army sharing what it knew about hasan with the fbi? while these patterns are preliminary and will be confirmed by the the investigations that are being conducted, it is very similar to what we experienced at fort bragg in the late '90s where we were wrongfully tolerating extremists in our organization who had displayed a pattern of be
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 3:00pm EST
thought they were vital to actually hear the living, breathing, cussing president of the united states trying to be, try to run a people's government. and i knew that that kind of record have dried up ignobly had recorded their conversations since nixon. my impression was that they are not keeping the kind of record data that will enable you to really find out today what george bush was really thinking before he went into iraq. you know, we're going to have to make do with the myth and the filters and images. and i wanted to do better than that. i was done that he wanted to do better than that. he was thinking about those things even before he took office. >> host: describe briefly 1972. how well did you know him? >> guest: we live together. were the two texas coordinator he asked if he could bring his new girlfriend, hillary, to our apartment so the three of us got an apartment together. hillary also worked in other states and even bill and i had the time, we were traveling all over like water bugs in the big state of texas. we didn't spend all that much time together. we were technically re
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 4:00pm EST
husidics had a choice, go back to boss the kneia, or end up in the united states. they went to chicago. >> that's when i finally felt like you can enjoy life now, we've made it. you can relax now. you know, it's yours, so, you know, i always, like, wanted to have a house i could have friends over and stuff, and every day, like, since we had the house, i always have people over, there's not like one day where my mom is not cooking for everyone. but in bosnia, it's just like that. you always have family over, friends over, you're grilling. >> reporter: and from there, life was good. boggio starred in soccer, and now he's getting plenty of playing time for the fire. >> i can't really describe like how you feel, like -- because you, like, you remember, when you go back, it all comes back to you like everything happened yesterday, and its just like, you know, it's -- you try to make it happy where you get to see your family again, but as soon as like that goes away, like, wow, like i left all of this behind. what if i didn't have this sort of future? >> reporter: and so you can understand w
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 7:00am EST
women deserve all the rights granted male citizens of the united states remained in fused with and sometimes damaged by a deep sense of entitlement. she was more like the nation's founders and she realized. like them she refused or failed to look too) or critically at her own complex place in the society she wished to change. elizabeth cady stanton left a huge legacy and it gets no smaller by complicating it. for all her limitations, few nineteenth century women loom quite as large. like the men we call the founding fathers she took what she viewed as simple truth and wove them into a velocity of rights that once expressed seem too obvious to debate. she didn't invent the notion of equal rights nor was she the first to demand they be extended to women but she grabbed the ideas that floated around her, shook them hard, shipment to word that strong and accessible, mixed it with some dose of charm and charisma and flung them back into the world forcefully enough to move countless others to act. elizabeth cady stanton could never focus on just one goal, one divot in the unlevel playing
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 11:00pm EST
importance. we are certainly seeing that in the united states as well. at the same time we faced a very difficult moment in gathering public opinion behind this agenda, especially at the moment of global financial crisis. it is not whether we as scientists can persuade politicians to act. it is whether the public can lead politicians to make these difficult decisions so our audience has to be the public, the wider community to get their support behind this agenda and to lead us into making what some say, tough unpalatable decisions. one thing we have to do is work much better to integrate climate change with other aspects of the health agenda. i think one of the issues for us is we have drawn a boundary around climate change and we integrated into bubba-- broader global health issues and it is time for these agendas to merge, to speak to one another. we are not just climate change advocates. we are help that the kids around a range of issues. we still have sadly even amongst our own health community a huge amount of persuading to do and he writes speak directly to our american colleague
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 5:00pm EST
flattened by kitchen. united states marine corps scoring leaders in this ball game, chris singleton already with ten points. mercer has five with just three. >> dan: five three point field goals made by five different guys. >> rich: florence. another miss on a three. put back. and it might be a goal tend. bob hoffman -- alabi got up. the ball was off glass. whether it was going down toward the cylinder or not, we'll take a look. watch the end of this play. >> dan: that balm never got above the rim or it would have been a goal tend because if it's above the rim and it hits off the back word -- >> rich: it didn't have a chance to go this. >> dan: see, that's a play by mills where he gets the offense receive rebound and in most games under normal circumstance, you power the ball back up to the basket, but in this game, i'm not sure the best move isn't to kick it out and find an open three-point shooter. sometimes your best opportunity for a three point shot is in a scramble situation where everybody hasn't matched up with his man quite yet. >> rich: kitchen out there with singlet singl
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 1:00am EST
his missions to the united states in 1926, he committed an act of violence, and attempted murder in los angeles and was incarcerated in san quentin prison. this becomes a very crucial question as to the veracity of his famous book, "our of the night," in 1941, when eventually appears. immediately it had the following effect on him: krebbs became one of the editors and contributors to the san quentin prisoners magazine. he took lots of extension courses in writing from the university of california and at that point he determined to become a writer. he got all of san quentin in 1929, was deported, went back to europe and got caught up again and communist activities. according to him, he was thrown into jail by the nazis from which he escaped by the following routt: he converted to nazism, the nazis let him out so he could go out and be as it were a double agent for his former communist allies. they, however, didn't think there was anything phony about his -- about his conversion. and under these circumstances, he said he chased by the secret police, both of russia and of germany. he t
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 5:00pm EST
united states was putting less money into agriculture than anyone talking about the structure. it didn't make a lot of sense to us. so if i mentioned last time i was here, we phased out support ing activity. some may still go on. the u.s. is not involved. the military is focusing on it, and they are working closer to dea, and the fbi, and other parts of the u.s. government. and they have the very substantial success in addiction. and meanwhile, with putting a lot of money into agricultural. gonzalez is our liaison. secretary clinton will be going to afghanistan soon. the date is not clear. she will be going early next year. that will be very important. so she engaged in a very detailed suggestion of agriculture with the minister. then the finance minister discussed both economic issues, the ongoing negotiations and transit agreement. which president obama had mentioned specifically in the may 6th and 7th. it is our point person. and that both here and islamic of kabul. we talked about anti-corruption efforts. and the general financial state of afghanistan. then the minister of education
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 2:00pm EST
products. and when michael was concerned the gdp in the united states in 2007 the/2008 would be punched in the gut as the mortgage resets start to hurt families at some point* you have to pay the piper. there were so many of these products i will never forget the warning about subprime and i had never heard of. i did not know about that in 2005 and this is the first time i was exposed to these words and mortgage resets almost on the american vernacular it was the best and bravest smartest people of lehman brothers started to call the warnings. the tragedy of the men brothers the warnings were ignored and people were silence. lehman brothers kept to their head down and did their job. i saw one great person after another silent global risk manager 2005 would be a one investment banking questioning whether or not remission get into a big deal and richard fuld said shut up. this is what they had. a sense of fear and a tragedy was that we were going faster and faster and faster rate toward that iceberg. one by one by a wide great people that i really care a lot about or silence. there were so m
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2009 6:00am EST
goodell, wo was both a member of congress and a united states senator. roger goodell played football himself in college. and he's -- been with the -- with the -- with the national football league for many years. . . >> thank you, mr. chairman. ranking members met, and members of the committee, i submitted a false statement and ask it be included in your records. -- a full statement and ask it be included in your records. i can think of no issue to which i have devoted as much time and attention at -- then the help of nfl players, particularly retired players. i want to review what we've done in the past years to make sure -- to show what we have done. since i became commissioner, we've made a wide range of improvements in both benefits and administration of the disability plan. we've doubled the minimum benefit and lengthen the time within which players can provide -- apply for benefits. we obtained a new independent director. we have simplified the process for applicants and their families. each of these changes was made at our initiative. as we proceed did -- preceded the current r
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 1:00am EST
way, not one has chosen to adopt the united states system, and we should ask why. because it does not provide the same kind of representation. i do believe we should have proportional representation and if we don't get there yet, joyce surmising voting systems or combination thereof because for example how many saab the front page of "the new york times" where they talked about new york city had a runoff election and in a city of almost 8 million people almost nobody showed up to vote. 3 million registered democrats than you had some districts were actually nobody came to vote. we can do better than this, so maybe, and i would start i believe we should start looking at things like the electoral college which are anachronistic now and i know those might be fighting wars here but i would be happy to engage in think about how we want to improve our system. our system was great maybe for the 18th century but were now in the 21st century and there have been kinds of systems the pies that can be applied they can do things, make the electoral system more reflective of the will of the people.
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 1:00am EST
. secretary of state, secretary of war, and finally, to term president of the united states, the fifth president. as governor of virginia he became the second most powerful figure in america. virginia then was america's largest, wealthiest and heavily populated state with 20% of the american population. it stretched all the way to the mississippi river and all the way north to the great lakes. it was enormous and the prestige and its importance of the governor was akin to the governors of california, illinois, new york and texas put together. and monroe was not only governor of america's most important state, he was a national hero in the revolutionary war. in other words he was a giant in his day and i don't understand why historians ignore him which is why i wrote this book to restore him to his rightful place in american history as the most important president in the early days of the nation. now some historians elevate john adams to historical prominence and most historians deify thomas jefferson and james madison and these were three great founding fathers and great political phil
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2009 12:00pm EST
decided it would be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that con
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 8:00pm EST
is also in the interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows that achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not weaver and his persistent pursuit of comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. to be clear, the steps we have suggested to all parties -- israel, the palestinians, and the arab states -- to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends to themselves, and they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. but they can make a valuable contribution toward achieving our goal of successful negotiations that result in a two-state solution. that's why we've urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action on incitement. it's why we have urged the arab states to take steps toward normalization of relations with israel, and it's why we have urged israel to
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2009 5:00pm EST
facing cities and metropolitan areas in the united states. and the implications for the economic recovery. as many of you know, of the standing contention of our program at berkeley and is that we are a metropolitan nation, that the national economy as a central makeup of a network of metropolitan economies. and so national economic recovery from the current downturn very much depends on the recovery of metropolitan economies. today we are going to be discussing how to largely extend the recovery of metros depends to a meaningful degree on cities and other local governments being fiscally healthy. it's not yet been covered too much in the mainstream public discourse, but given the worst recession we've seen in decades, a potentially overwhelming local government fiscal crisis is now looming on the horizon. our partners at the national league of cities have conducted a very timely survey, showing the nearly nine and ten city finance officers are reporting difficulties in meeting fiscal needs in 2009 and expect the same in 2010. the pain is widespread from foreclosures and metros l
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 11:00pm EST
vanderbilt helped create. the united states as a qanta nets banning country, vanderbilt played a role in simply the geographical expansion of the u.s.. as i said in the making of or economic values, vanderbilt was at the heart of that. even as the young man printing and advertising that picked up jacksonian rhetoric very exquisitely, so i don't want in any way to diminish the importance of people like rockefeller and carnegie or later on for from many of these others. what they did is incredibly important in developing the economy and also in creating a lot of practices. jpmorgan of course in a very different way-- jeane strauts as written brilliantly about his importance and as a banker he intersected and dealt with so many other areas of industrial america, railroad and other areas so i don't want to diminish their important to a certain extent it is meaningless to say who is up and you is down, but the distinction that they said that would make is that vanderbilt covered this formatives period. born in the presidency of george washington, starting a business as the teenager before the
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2009 7:00pm EST
if at all should the health care system in the united states be changed? an astounding 38% said -- 4% a great deal or moderate amount. 2% of all small business owners want congress to enact some kind of reform and no wonder as small businesses have experienced annual premium increases of at least 20% year after year after year. and the reality that this is not simply a solution in search after problem is what really brought us together in the senate finance committee in the so-called group of six that i commend chairman baucus and senator grassley as well. chairman baucus wanted to convene on a bipartisan basis earlier this year. it was the only bipartisan effort any committee in the house or the senate and we met more than 31 times to debate policy, not politics in attempting to reach a bipartisan consensus on reform legislation. there really reflected the kind of extensive, meticulous process that an issue of this magnitude requires because the american people understand intuitively when you debate future of one-sixth of our economy in a matter of such personal and financial signif
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 12:00pm EST
in the united states. investment banks are on your own, you can do what ever you want, maybe not totally but you can speculate and trade into what ever but we don't have your back. we are not going. >> at risk this mac the taxpayers of back you out. >> guest: the fdic won't be there. >> you are ensure your debt which is kind of what they're doing with goldman sachs and morgan stanley. it just won't happen because it makes no sense. >> host: then we came to the 80s and 90s and people like alan greenspan and bob rubin proceeded to tell the congress my dad was glass-steagall was a terrible destructive idea. >> guest: for years before the repeal robert rubin was talking about this notion we could be competitive in our banks are allowed to do whatever it is they do, that the 1933 glass-steagall act was integrated into that work in today's modern world of finance and who we are going to be at a loss actually. the u.s. will decline in financial supremacy if we are not going to allow our banks to do with the other banks are doing. >> host: so the congress against my vote repeal the glass
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 10:00pm EST
the first national historic district that commenced in the 20th century in the united states of america. a very audacious objective with brilliantly executed jeans. she then spent the rest of her life trying to convince the local governments miami-dade county and miami beach to develop the ordinances and other necessary legal mechanisms to protect this a national historic district. unfortunately she died three years before the full realization of her ever. but now there is a st. i believe it is tenth st. which is named for barber. eyesight her because she is the kind of person and that i believe all americans can be if they have a sufficient amount of internal self-confidence and a willingness to acquire the competencies' to be an effective citizen. this book, it "america the owner's manual" is devoted to preparing all americans for active and effective and honorable citizenship. i have defined and in this is totally my doing, but what are the 10 essentials skills of effective citizenship? barbara had most of those skills. she had the skills through her experience in marketing w
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 10:00am EST
water. bangladesh is a country of 1 sixty million people, half that of the united states. a three foot rise in sea level would put a good part of the become dulled the beneath the sea. that produces half of the rice for vietnam. a country of eighty million people and the country that is the world's second rising rice exporter after thailand. others will be affected in varying degrees by rising sea level. imagine ice melting in the far north atlantic will shrink the rice harvest of asia. but this is not the most serious threat. that is coming from melting mountain glaciers. the glacier monitoring institute in switzerland has now reported the eighteenth consecutive year of shrinking mountain glaciers around the world. they monitor glaciers in the andes and the rocky mountains, the alps, the himalayas, the tibetan plateau and they're reporting glaciers are melting everywhere. it is the ice melts from the glaciers in the himalayas and on the tibetan plateau that sustains the major rivers of asia during the dry season. it is that i smelled that sustains the rivers that also sustains th
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 9:00am EST
and lyndon johnson was president of the united states and he says my secret service pan you'll tells me to protect the president of the united states, and that was johnson. so he goes into -- he's the first person to give a report to lyndon johnson. now, roberts has already made up his mind that kennedy is dead and johnson is present, but with he sees johnson that's not what he says. what he says to johnson, he says, i have seen the president's wounds and i don't think he can survive. and johnson says, i need more information, i want to hear from kenny o'donnell, who was -- his title was appointment secretary, he was in fact, sort of chief of he staff for the kennedy white house, and he wants to hear from roy kellerman, who was president kennedy's secret service agent, so emmy roberts leaves the room. he runs into lem johns, who is another secret service agent, who had arrived at the hospital late and says to roberts, have you seen -- what's the president's condition? and he says very matter of factually, the president is dead and later, roberts told william manchester, he said
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 7:30pm EST
good work. we are not looking to the united states or europe for crude oil. we are looking more towards india and china and developing countries of africa. in the rate of growth for china has come out very strongly. so has india to a point. and this is where the incremental divide is going to come from, not from the united states or western europe. and this recovery continues, we think we should be able to sell as much oil as we are selling now. and if it is a bonus and a growth in europe and north studl amounts, then there may be room for some more incremented in the quantity of oil that we put back. at the moment, i don't see that as such a likelihood, but what i said was in the event of the international market calling for oil in order to keep prices within reasonable level and we are ready to put more out. [inaudible]
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 12:00pm EST
than half a century, the united states has been using a base technology to create vaccine. while it is safe and effective, it's a slow-moving process. across europe, vaccine developers are using the faster process of incorporating the million sales to grow the vaccine. as we begin to explore cell-based technology, i would pose the question will there be an adequate fda approval for this new vaccine? i'm also interested in hearing in the vaccine manufacturers from how they ramped up reduction in some cases to ten times their normal production schedule. we know that production of a delayed for h1n1, a harmful but relatively moderate virus compared to something more lethal like the spanish flu. but in the case of a stronger virus, the higher fatality rate, what our country be able to produce enough vaccine for everyone in a short time. here it so i look forward to questioning the witnesses, welcome them again, learning more about how we can improve vaccine reduction in our country and again thank the chairman for this joint an important hearing. i yield back. >> thank you ms. eshoo. ge
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